Lars,<br><br>I would prefer a simple colon as well. But unlike David's "pseudo namespace style" interpretation, I would like to go on a tangent for a bit.<br><br>The elephant in the room regarding mathematics and the semantic web is that of identifiers. Both mathematics and semantic web technologies will suffer until people remedy this. There are essentially 3 types of identifiers in common use: URIs (in RDF), QNames (in XML), and OMSymbols (in MathML). In order to convert between them, this is how I've personally internalized the solution to this problem:<br>
<br>- [URI => QName] If the URI originated from an OMSymbol, then split on '#'. The new QName's namespaceURI is the first part (including '#'), and the localName is the second part. If the URI starts with '{', then it is (an INVALID URI) produced by javax.xml.namespace.QName#toString(), in which case we split on '}' and do as above. If the URI contains '::', then it is a VALID URI produced by ECMAScript for XML (E4X) QName.prototype.toString(), in which case we split on '::' and do as above. If the URI ends with a '/' followed by a valid NCName, then split on that, and do as above. Otherwise, give up.<br>
<br>- [QName => URI] If the URI ends in '#' or '/' or some other punctuation, then concatenate. If we're using Java, return "{$namespaceURI}$localName". If we're using E4X, return "$namespaceURI::$localName". If there are any applicable standards (such as XSDatatypes), defer to those. Otherwise, give up.<br>
<br>- [URI => OMSymbol] If the URI originated from an OMSymbol, then split on '#' and '/' and reverse the standard [OMSymbol => URI] mapping. Otherwise, give up.<br><br>- [QName => OMSymbol] If the QName's namespaceURI ends in '#' then split on '/' the new OMSymbol's cdbase becomes the first part, and its cd becomes the second part, the new OMSymbol's name is the QName's localName. Otherwise, give up.<br>
<br>- [OMSymbol => QName] Concatenate, the QName's namespaceURI becomes "$cdbase/$cd#", and its localName is the OMSymbol's name part.<br><br>- [OMSymbol => URI] Concatenate, return "$cdbase/$cd#$name".<br>
<br>With these mappings in mind:<br><br><m:csymbol xmlns:m="<a href="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML">http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML</a>" cd="nums1">gamma</m:csymbol><br>and<br><OMOBJ xmlns="<a href="http://www.openmath.org/OpenMath">http://www.openmath.org/OpenMath</a>" cdbase="<a href="http://www.openmath.org/cd">http://www.openmath.org/cd</a>"><br>
  <OMS cd="nums1" name="gamma"/><br></OMOBJ><br><br>would be mapping-equivalent to:<br><br><nums1:gamma xmlns:nums1="<a href="http://www.openmath.org/cd/nums1#">http://www.openmath.org/cd/nums1#</a>"/><br>
and<br><gamma xmlns="<a href="http://www.openmath.org/cd/nums1#">http://www.openmath.org/cd/nums1#</a>"/><br><br>which represent XML QNames, but in RDF "nums1:gamma" would represent a URI, which is much closer to OpenMath style.<br>
<br>Just as a note, some of these mappings I'm using in my software projects. I've been working on a lot of compilers lately, and I've been using a variant of OpenMath/MathML to represent the AST. If you would like a preview of what I've been working on: <a href="https://github.com/andydude/python2drox">https://github.com/andydude/python2drox</a> is a quick prototype I made for Python, and <a href="https://github.com/andydude/droscheme">https://github.com/andydude/droscheme</a> is a much more complicated project that compiles Scheme to Go.<br>
<br>In conclusion, <nums1:gamma/> would (under these mappings) be valid for the first argument for <OMA> and <m:apply> elements if nums1 was a declared namespace prefix which matched the nums1 content dictionary URI.<br>
<br>Regards,<br>Andrew<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 8:46 AM, Lars Hellström <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:Lars.Hellstrom@residenset.net" target="_blank">Lars.Hellstrom@residenset.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Writing a paper, it occurs to me that since most of the OM I've seen has been the raw XML encodings of objects, I'm not so sure how one would preferably refer to an OM symbol in ordinary text. If rather than saying for example "Euler's gamma constant" one wishes to refer specifically to the OM symbol for this constant what would one say? The full XML tag is of course one possibility, but<br>

<br>
  ... the occurrence of <OMS cd="nums1" name="gamma"/> in this<br>
  formula is most fortuitous, because then ...<br>
<br>
doesn't feel natural. (And that is all supposed to be character data, so in an XML source document it would be encoded as &lt;OMS cd="nums1" name="gamma"/&gt; or something. This is about what someone printing the text on paper should see, not what a robot crawling by should pick up.)<br>

<br>
Some styles which I think I have seen are<br>
<br>
  gamma@nums1     ("email style"?)<br>
  nums1#gamma     (URI style)<br>
  nums1.gamma     (Popcorn style?)<br>
<br>
Anyone wants to share any thoughts on what might be preferable, and why? And how would one format these things? Is it for example:<br>
<br>
  \texttt{gamma@nums1}<br>
  \texttt{gamma}@\texttt{nums1}<br>
  \texttt{nums1\#gamma}<br>
  \texttt{nums1}\#\texttt{gamma}<br>
  \texttt{nums1.gamma}<br>
  $\mathrm{nums1.gamma}$<br>
<br>
or what?<br>
<br>
I have a feeling that the name@cd style might have been more common in the early 00 decade, but that it has waned in favour of cd#name. I also have a feeling that the name@cd style might be more in line with how these things would naturally be spoken aloud. But my experience in these matters is limited.<br>

<br>
Lars Hellström<br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Om mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Om@openmath.org" target="_blank">Om@openmath.org</a><br>
<a href="http://openmath.org/mailman/listinfo/om" target="_blank">http://openmath.org/mailman/<u></u>listinfo/om</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>